Author Topic: Nine - unique local culture like the Catalans in Barcelona  (Read 4206 times)

Offline trophy4toon

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Nine - unique local culture like the Catalans in Barcelona
« on: November 07, 2010, 11:23:58 am »


There are a lot of similarities between Barcelona and the Catalans and Newcastle and the Geordie's.

Both large cities who support their huge football teams with a religous fervour.

Both sets of fans also have their own unique language, Catalan and Geordie, both derivitives of the national language.

So "Laarn yersel Geordie" whilst you come to Newcastle
« Last Edit: November 28, 2010, 12:08:23 pm by trophy4toon »

Offline trophy4toon

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Re: Nine - unique local culture like the Catalans in Barcelona
« Reply #1 on: August 23, 2011, 06:15:31 am »
Just in case you wondered about the history behind people in Newcastle being called Geordies:

Charlie, rubbish, the term Geordie does not come from­ the Durham mining communities although they may have­ contributed to the term if you are referring to the­ Geordie lamp. The term Geordie lamp as opposed to the­ Davy lamp comes mainly from the mines that existed­ along the Tyne valley (although in fairness the­ boundary changes that have occurred, some of those­ mines were in Co. Durham at some point but not the Co.­ Durham boundaries of today).

The term Geordie, however,­ was being used around the time of the Jacobite­ revolution to describe anyone who favoured King George­ and was applied to lowland Scots as an insult by­ Highlanders. The term was also applied to those from­ Newcastle who were described as Geordies in contrast to­ the Duke of Northumberland's support for the­ Jacobites.

Mackem comes from the ship yard rivalry­ between the Tyne and the Wear dockyards although it may­ also be between the workers of South Shields and those­ of Wallsend. Although I can't confirm it, I heard­ that there was something to do with a strike where by­ those South of the Tyne scabbed causing a hatred that­ has lasted ever since... which strike this was I am­ unsure, it could be the 1841 strike or it could be the­ general strike, the latter would explain why a large­ number of Jarrow people support Newcastle rather than­ Sunderland (although this could be because they like to­ supporter winners). What I am unsure about is why a­ large number of Amble people support Sunderland.

As­ for Co. Durham people ''should be''­ supporting Sunderland, surely they should be supporting­ a local team like West Auckland Town (once world cup­ holders) or Tow Law Town (where Chris Waddle once­ played) or Darlington FC or how about Durham City?
« Last Edit: August 23, 2011, 06:17:40 am by trophy4toon »

Offline trophy4toon

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Re: Nine - unique local culture like the Catalans in Barcelona
« Reply #2 on: August 23, 2011, 06:26:24 am »
Deadly rivals Sunderland are known as the Mackems. Someone at work surprisingly started talking to me about the Mackems and Tackems, this is relating to the shipyard days in the North East of England:

The term is derived from Mack'em and Tack'em, dating from the early ship building industry (i.e. the people on Wearside 'mak[e] them' and other people 'tak[e] them') and started off as an insult to the people of Sunderland by the Geordies. In recent years, however, the people of Sunderland have taken the name to be part of their identity as Wearsiders.

And your loyalty is split between Sunderland and Newcastle depending pretty much on where in the region you were born:

I can remember being at Roker Park singing­ "geordies here geordies there". Newcastle­ supporteres were called Mags not geordies..I think this­ changed sometime in the 80s when the word Makem­ appeared.. As for County Durham being all Sunderland­ supporters the majority are but when you get up to­ Chester le St and Consett they are predominantly mags.­ They even sound like mags. South Shields on the banks­ of the Tyne are split in their loyalties.
« Last Edit: August 23, 2011, 06:34:48 am by trophy4toon »

Offline trophy4toon

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Re: Nine - unique local culture like the Catalans in Barcelona
« Reply #3 on: August 23, 2011, 06:30:46 am »
And while we are on the subject of local Geordie culture there are plenty of dictionaries on the internet to help you understand the local Geordie language:

For example:
CCaa': Call
Cam: Came
Canny: A Versatile word. Canny old soul - a nice old person. Canny good Canny hard - very good or very tough. Canny job - a good job. Poosibly a variation on the Scots word Ken meaning to know.
Card: Cold
Chare: A narrow alley in Newcastle
Chorch: Church
Claes: Clothes - Anglo-Saxon
Clag: Stick
Clarts: Dirt or mud
Clarty: Dirty
Clivvor: Clever
Cloot: A cloth eg a dish cloot, or to clout.
Coo: A cow
Craa: Crow
Crack: To talk from Durtch Kraaken
Cracket: A wooden stool
Croggy: To give a passenger a ride on the crossbar or back of a bicylce
Croon: Crown
Cuddy: A small horse or St. Cuthbert
Cushat: A pigeon

http://www.englandsnortheast.co.uk/GeordieDictionary.html